100 Things to do in (and around) Bournemouth 60 – Hurst Castle

Hurst Castle is a fortress situated on the end of a shingle spit off the English coast, less than a mile from the Isle of Wight. The 16th Century castle has a long and interesting history plus spectacular views.

Hurst Castle Interior
Hurst Castle Interior

Getting There

The castle is situated 15 miles east of Bournemouth and can be reached either from Milford on Sea via a shingle spit or from Keyhaven by ferry.

Arriving at Hurst Point along the Shingle Spit
Arriving at Hurst Point along the Shingle Spit

Shingle Spit

The raised shingle spit is around two miles long. We ran along it to the castle during the lockdown, which was hard work but fun. The walk (run?) is quite hard on the legs, but the views are pretty special. I recommend sturdy shoes and plenty of water.

Shingle Spit to Hurst Castle
Shingle Spit to Hurst Castle

There is a car park near the beginning of the spit; Hurst Road East Car Park. Charges are seasonal, but approximately £1 an hour. Alternatively, the X1 and X2 buses runs from Bournemouth to Milford on sea, stopping close to the end of the spit.

Shingle Spit
Shingle Spit

Ferry

A more sedate but equally scenic way to access the castle is to take a short ferry ride from Keyhaven. The ferry runs between 10 am and 5.30 pm from April until October. Departures are, theoretically, every 30 minutes. However, in practice, during busy times ferries are far more frequent with boats departing as soon as they are full. An adult return ticket costs £7 (a single is £4).

Hurst Ferry
Hurst Ferry

There is parking near the ferry at Keyhaven Amenity Car Park. Note: if you decide to walk one way and take the ferry the other, the end of the spit and the ferry dock are about a mile apart.

Arriving at Hurst Point by Ferry
Arriving at Hurst Point by Ferry

Hurst Castle

The Castle, which is owned by English Heritage, is open daily between April and October, from 10 am until 5.30 pm (April – September) or 4 pm (October). As parts of the castle collapsed during storms in 2021, only the Tudor Castle is currently open to the public – The East and West Wings remain closed. Indeed, much of it lies on the beach in chunks, catalogued and ready to be reconstructed like an enormous jigsaw puzzle. Entry costs £4.50 for adults (free to English Heritage Members).

Hurst Castle Jigsaw Puzzle
Hurst Castle Jigsaw Puzzle

Tudor Castle

The original part of the castle is a Tudor fort, built in 1541 as part of Henry VIII’s coastal defences.

Tudor Castle

You can climb to the top of the Castle Keep for an amazing 360 degree view of the English coast, the channel and the Isle of Wight.

View from the Castle Keep
View from the Castle Keep

King Charles I

During the English Civil War, King Charles I was imprisoned in Hurst Castle briefly during 1648, before being returned to London and executed the following year.

Tudor Castle
Tudor Castle

World War II

The Castle played an important role in the country’s defences during World War II, guarding the south coast from the risk of German invasion. There are weapons and other military paraphernalia from this era on display.

 World War II Kit
World War II Kit

Lighthouses

Hurst Point’s key position at the entry to the channel running between the English coast and the Isle of Wight, combined with the shifting nature of the shingle, has resulted in the building of several lighthouses.

Hurst Point High Light
High Light

Three remain intact; two within the castle itself; the 19th Century High Light and the 20th Century Low Light (built on a steel gantry so it could be moved to a new position if necessary). They formed a line which helped guide ships into the channel.

Hurst Point Low Light
Low Light

Hurst Point Lighthouse

The currently operational lighthouse was built in 1867 and is situated just outside the castle grounds.

Hurst Point Lighthouse
Hurst Point Lighthouse

Cafe

There is a small cafe (open between April and October) and a gift shop near the ferry dock, just outside the castle castle entrance. It’s a pleasant place to sit and relax whilst waiting for a ferry/psyching yourself up for the two mile return shingle extravanganza.

Hurst Castle Exterior
Hurst Castle Exterior

100 Things to do in (and around) Bournemouth 59 – Highcliffe Castle

Highcliffe Castle

Highcliffe Castle, perched on the cliff top on the outskirts of Highcliffe, isn’t quite as old as the name ‘Castle’ might suggest. The original Highcliffe Mansion was built (too close to the cliff edge) in 1775. Once this house had been lost to coastal erosion, the current Highcliffe Castle was built, slightly further inland, between 1831 and 1836.

Highcliffe Castle
Highcliffe Castle (Front)

The castle, a Grade I Listed Building, built in the ‘Romantic and Picturesque’ Style, was the the brainchild of Lord Stuart de Rothesay. This former ambassador to France imported stone from a derelict French abbey to be incorporated into the construction.

Highcliffe Castle
Highcliffe Castle (Front)

Later, from 1916 to 1922 the house was rented by Harry Gordon Selfridge, founder of the Selfridges Department Store. After functioning as a children’s home and a religious seminary, it was partially destroyed by fire. A period of neglect followed before it was compulsorily purchased by the council in 1977. The castle is now owned by the local (BCP) council who have undertaken the task of restoring it to its former glory.

Highcliffe Castle
Highcliffe Castle (Rear)

Highcliffe Castle is situated 8 miles east of Bournemouth and can be reached via bus routes X1 and X2. There is plenty of parking in the castle grounds, although with a popular Blue Flag beach at the bottom of the cliffs, this can fill up quickly in summer. The car park is Pay & Display. Fees are approximately £1.50 per hour (with a maximum time limit of 4 hours) during summer and a flat rate of 70p between October and March. The castle is open from Sunday to Thursday between 10 am and 4 pm. Although the castle is closed to visitors on Fridays and Saturdays, the shop (10-1) and tea rooms (10-4) remain open. Admission costs £7 for adults.

Highcliffe Castle (Rear)
Highcliffe Castle (Rear)

Castle Grounds

The castles grounds were designed in 1775 by famous landscape architect Capability Brown, who planted trees to stabilise the cliff top as well as introducing more formal gardens and a beach hut. To the rear of the castle is the formal parterre. From here, woodland walks extend along the coast.

Highcliffe Castle Gardens
Highcliffe Castle Gardens

The grounds are open daily from 7 am, closing at around dusk; 6.30 pm (November-March) 7.30 pm (April and October), 9 pm (May and September) and 10 pm (June-August).

Cafe

The castle has tea gardens to the rear where you can purchase drinks and snacks and sit on the terrace and watch the world (and wedding guests) go by.

Highcliffe Castle and Cafe

Steamer Point

A nice ‘circular’ walk to take is to follow the path along the cliff top to Steamer Point, then descend and return along the beach. Steamer Point is so called because in 1829 the castle’s owner decided to have a steamer lodged into a gap in the cliff tops because, well she liked paddle steamers?

Steamer Point
Steamer Point

Steamer Point Lodge

The steamer is long gone, but there is a house built above where it used to lie called Steamer Point Lodge. This two bedroom former warden’s lodge on the cliff top is now a holiday rental with stunning views and beach access.

Steamer Point Lodge
Steamer Point Lodge

Steamer Point Nature Reserve

The surrounding area forms Steamer Point Nature Reserve, which consists of a wooded area running alongside a lake.

View from Steamer Point
View from Steamer Point

Steamer Point Woodland Information Centre

There is a small building where you can learn more about the nature of the surrounding area with interactive displays for children.

Steamer Point Woodland Information Centre
Steamer Point Woodland Information Centre

Highcliffe Beach

The Blue Flag Highcliffe Beach can be reached via a sloping zigzag (no steps) or by (118) steps from the cliff top. It consists of a sandy beach lined with grassy sand dunes.

Highcliffe Beach
Highcliffe Beach

100 Things to do in (and around) Bournemouth 58 – Poole Harbour Cruise

Poole Harbour is the second largest natural harbour in the world covering an area of 14 square miles. There are a number of options for cruising in the harbour with stalls along the quayside advertising the various trips.

Preparing to board at Poole Quay
Preparing to board at Poole Quay

We opted for the City Cruises Harbour Lights Cruise, which was due to depart at 7 pm for a 90 minute cruise around the harbour. The cost of the cruise was £11.50. In addition, City Cruises offer trips further along the coast to Swanage (with option to disembark and return on a later boat) and the Jurassic Coast, plus special cruises such as the Thursday Firework Cruise, Murder Mysteries, musical evenings etc.

Drinking wine on Poole Quay
Drinking wine on Poole Quay

It took a little longer than anticipated to find a parking space, so we didn’t have time to buy dinner beforehand, only just making it to the quay by 7 pm. When we arrived, we were told that our cruise had been combined with the 7.30 pm Fish & Chips cruise. So, we sat in the sunshine on the quayside and had a couple of glasses of wine before boarding.

Brownsea Island
Brownsea Island

Once on board, we set off in a clockwise direction around the harbour towards Brownsea Island. The tour has an informative running commentary, so I now know that Brownsea Island is the largest of five islands situated in the harbour. It is owned by the National Trust and is open to visitors between March and October.

Ferry
Ferry

We need to stop briefly to let the chain link ferry, which crosses the mouth of the harbour between Sandbanks and Studland, go past. Meanwhile, those who booked the Fish & Chips Cruise are served their food. I’m starving, so it’s tortuous watching other passengers eating their dinner. The smell wafts across the deck making me even hungrier. There’s only one thing for it – finish the wine my friend has secreted in her handbag, together with a bag of crisps (it’s a big handbag).

Poole Harbour Jetskiers
Poole Harbour Jetskiers

We set sail again towards the Purbecks, chased by jet skiers racing across the bay.

Old Harry
Old Harry

We reach Old Harry; named after an infamous local pirate, this chalk stack is the last in a line of formations which mark the start of the Jurassic Coast. I’ve walked/run to the top of the cliff a few times, but this is my first view of the rocks from the other side, and it’s quite a view!

Purbeck Sunset
Purbeck Sunset

At this point, the boat turns and heads for home into the sunset, which provides us with a different, even more stunning view of the rocks with the setting sun behind them.

Purbeck Sunset
Purbeck Sunset

We cruise back towards the quay whilst enjoying watching the sun set beneath the harbour.

Poole Harbour sunset
Poole Harbour sunset

Our return voyage takes us along the edge of Sandbanks; dubbed Millionaires’ Row with allegedly the fourth highest property prices in the world, this row of 13 houses has a combined value of almost one hundred million pounds.

Millionaires' Row
Millionaires’ Row

We continue past plenty of yachts. Another reminder of how the other half live, as we pass by on our £11.50 cruise, sipping supermarket wine from plastic cups.

Poole Harbour sunset
Poole Harbour sunset

We arrive back at Poole Quay just as it is getting dark. We’ve really enjoyed our cruise around the harbour with its beautiful scenery and amazing sunset. Unfortunately, the chip shop has closed by the time we arrive, so we go in search of dinner elsewhere.

Poole Quay
Poole Quay

100 Things to do in (and around) Bournemouth 57 – Canford Cliffs Beach

One of Poole’s four Blue Flag Beaches in Canford Cliffs Beach. Situated between Poole and Bournemouth, this beach has fewer facilities than some of its neighbours, which can make it a good option on a busy day, as it can be slightly less crowded. The beach is accessed via a zigzag path from Cliff Drive (note: there are a lot of steps) or via Canford Cliffs Chine (no steps). There is free roadside parking on the cliff top.

Canford Cliffs Chine
Canford Cliffs Chine

Canford Cliffs Chine

This tree lined chine runs from the cliff top down the beach. At the bottom are pretty wooden beach huts set in a garden and at the top are picnic benches and a Pirate Ship themed children’s play area.

Canford Cliffs Chine
Canford Cliffs Chine

Lifeguards

The Canford Cliffs Beach Lifeguard tower is manned from 10 am until 6 pm on weekends and Bank Holidays between 13 August and 4 September

Canford Cliffs Beach
Canford Cliffs Beach

Bars/Restaurants

Beach catering facilities are limited to a kiosk selling drinks and snacks. However, there are pubs and restaurants on the cliff top or in the pretty little village of Canford Cliffs a few minutes walk away.

Canford Cliffs Beach - Prom
Canford Cliffs Beach – Prom

Other Facilities

The beach has toilets and a Hydration Station for refilling your water bottles.

Canford Cliffs Hydration Station

100 Things to do in (and around) Bournemouth 56 – Get Cheesy

It is a fundamental fact of life that you can’t have too much cheese. To deal with this inevitability, there is Renoufs. This local chain of Cheese & Wine bars is situated at 7 locations in and around Bournemouth, with branches in Westbourne, Wimborne, Lyndhurst, Canford Cliffs, Verwood and our very own local – Southbourne.

Renoufs Party Platter
Renoufs Party Platter

The allocation of cheese is determined by party size. Pictured is the Party Board; designed to serve 4 people, it consists of 8 cheeses and 8 meets selected from the day’s list. This comes on a board scattered with accompaniments, such as bread, crackers, pate, olives, hummus and pickles.

Renoufs Party Platter
Renoufs Party Platter

There are similar offers for smaller/larger parties. A vegan option is also available, although it contains things such as stuffed vine leaves and avocado salad as ‘a delicious alternative to cheese’ rather than vegan cheese, which, I feel, would be a more delicious alternative.

Another Night at Renoufs
Another Night at Renoufs

To top off a perfect evening of cheese consumption, wine is offered either by the glass or as a Wine Flight of 3 samples. And if you really can’t get enough cheese, there’s even the option of a Cheesecake Flight for dessert.

Another Night at Renoufs
Another Night at Renoufs

Shopping for Cheese

In addition to its restaurant chain, Renoufs has two Pantry Cheese Shops; in Westbourne and Christchurch. Here you can purchase a wide range of cheeses plus those all important cheese accompaniments such as crackers and condiments. In addition, there are seasonal offerings like picnic goodies in summer and hampers at Christmas. You can even buy a tiered cheese wedding cake.

The Bournemouth suburb of Southbourne may only be small, but it’s big on cheese. A few doors down from Renoufs is another cheese shop; Parlourmentary. Here, you can buy a wide range of cheeses, plus other deli provisions and a variety of locally produced goodies such as fruit & veg, baked goods and ice cream.

Parlourmentary

100 Things to do in (and around) Bournemouth 55 – RNLI Mudeford Lifeboat Fun Day

The RNLI Mudeford Lifeboat Fun Day is, as the name suggests, a day of fun activities to raise money for the Mudeford Lifeboat. The highlights of the event are a Raft Race and a Duck Race. In addition, there are a lifeboat displays, food stalls, items for sale, fairground rides, live music and other attractions.

RNLI Lifeboat Fun Day
RNLI Lifeboat Fun Day

The event takes place, spreading out from Mudeford Quay and onto the marshlands around Christchurch Harbour. There is what is described as ‘Park & Stride’ parking at nearby Stanpit Recreation Ground (i.e. Park & Ride without the actual Ride bit).

Raft Race
Raft Race

We arrived at the Fun Day just in time for the raft race, which entails local groups and businesses racing home made rafts along the quayside.

Raft Race
Raft Race

It was the first time that this usually annual event had taken place in four years due to bad weather and Covid. But today was a perfect summer’s day and the crowds were out in their thousands. This meant that it was difficult to actually see the action, but there was a running commentary, as we tried to snatch glimpses of the race through the rows and rows of people lined up on the harbourside. In the end, we resorting to filming the race on our phones held above our heads and then watching the video footage.

Tony Hairdressing at the Raft Race
Tony Hairdressing at the Raft Race

Tony Hairdressing, in their flamingo themed raft and matching flamingo outfits, brought up the rear of the race but won the prize for best turned out raft.

RNLI Mascot
RNLI Mascot

Raft race over, we took a wander around the site, trying to avoid the rather creepy RNLI mascot. To be honest, I find all mascots creepy – apparently it is an actual condition called masklophobia.

Fairground Rides
Fairground Rides

We made a brief stop at a donut stall for sustenance, whilst watching people enjoying the fairground rides.

Fairground Rides
Fairground Rides

Then we attempted to buy some RNLI themed goodies, but there were issues with the card reader and plenty of visitors who had turned up without cash. I managed to pay for my goods. However, thereafter, the card reader ceased to function completely and a large queue formed, while a volunteer tried various tricks (including some really weird ones suggested by people in the queue) to reconnect. Eventually, we gave up queuing and set off back along the quayside, while I pondered why on earth anyone would think that sticking a card reader to your head would help with wifi reception?)

RNLI Biscuits
RNLI Biscuits

The Duck Race consists of thousands of rubber ducks racing along the river. Visitors are offered the opportunity to purchase a duck for £1. The first duck across the line wins its ‘owner’ a £50 prize. However, they had sold out of ducks before we reached the duck stall.

Mudeford Spit
Mudeford Spit from Mudeford Quay

So, we decided to call it a day and went in search of lunch. It was indeed a fun day and I shall be back next year (with cash).

100 Things to do in (and around) Bournemouth 54 – Stompin’ on the Quomps

The rather unusually named Stompin’ on the Quomps is Christchurch’s annual jazz festival. It takes place in the park on the edge of Christchurch Harbour, aka ‘The Quomps’. Running for one day in August, from midday until 10 pm, it’s mainly about the music. But there is also food and other entertainment. Entry is free, but a suggested minimum donation of £5 is welcomed. In addition, there is a raffle to help raise funds for this unticked event.

 Hop on Inn Bus Bar
Purchasing supplies at the Hop on Inn Bus Bar

I’ll be honest, I was looking forward to Stompin’ on the Quomps until I saw some drone footage posted by the organisers posted around lunch time. To say it was busy was an understatement. A heatwave during the school holidays coinciding with the first day of the Premier League football season means the world and his wife has headed for Bournemouth this weekend. Much as I love Bournemouth, on days like today, I prefer to remain in my garden with my cats.

Drone footage of Stompin’ on the Quomps

However, with daughter no two’s in-laws visiting, I relent and we head off to catch the end of the show. The crowds fill the entire field, but there are a plethora of loud speakers spread around the Quomps, so you can hear the music clearly wherever you are.

Stompin' on the Quomps
Visiting Stompin’ on the Quomps

People have brought chairs and blankets and set up mini camps on the grassy bank to enjoy the music in the sunshine. There is a lovely, chilled party vibe.

Stompin' on the Quomps
Crowds at Stompin’ on the Quomps

The whole site is surrounded by a ring of food and drink stalls selling all manner of goodies – we head straight for a Pimms stall. Once we have our drinks, we take a wander round the site.

Pimms at Stompin' on the Quomps
Pimms at Stompin’ on the Quomps

At first, we can’t work out where the music is coming from – there doesn’t appear to be a stage. Then we realise that the band is actually in the bandstand (duh). Right on the edge of the Quomps, the Edwardian bandstand is currently home to Taverners Big Band.

Taverners Big Band
Taverners Big Band

We really enjoy the band’s performance, which is mainly instrumental, but they are joined on stage by a singer for numbers like Mack the Knife. The bandstand is surrounded by a ring of enthusiastic dancers.

Stompin' on the Quomps
Dancing to the Band

The performance is excellent, as is the whole atmosphere of the festival. The live music continues as the sun sets over the harbour for a perfect evening. I’m regretting not coming much earlier in the day – a mistake not to be made next year!

Sunset over Stompin' on the Quomps
Sunset over Stompin’ on the Quomps

100 Things to do in (and around) Bournemouth 53 – Fireworks

Bournemouth Friday Fireworks

Every Friday in August sees a free firework display take place on Bournemouth sea front. Visible from pretty much anywhere along the beach or cliff top, it takes place at 10 pm. Just follow the crowds heading for the coast ‘Pied Piper’ style to enjoy the show. This year’s displays will take place on August 5th, 12th, 19th and 26th.

Bournemouth Fireworks
Bournemouth Fireworks

Air Display Fireworks

In addition to the August displays, there are also fireworks at 10 pm, on the Friday and Saturday of the air display. This year, dates are Friday September 2nd (Boscombe Pier) and Saturday 3rd (Bournemouth Pier).

Bournemouth Fireworks
Bournemouth Fireworks

These displays takes place after the dusk air show, which also contains fireworks, as Otto the Helicopter hovers over the bay discharging his load.

Otto the Helicopter Fireworks
Otto the Helicopter Fireworks

Poole Thursday Fireworks

In Poole, the firework action takes place on Thursdays. Displays will be at 10 pm on 21st and 28th July plus 4th, 11th, 18th and 25th August on the quayside. In addition to fireworks, there will be music, street entertainers and fairground rides available in the build up.

Firework Display
Firework Display

Firework Cruise

For a great view of the fireworks, City Cruises offer a Firework Cruise. Departing at 8.30, you can enjoy the fireworks from the vantage of Poole Harbour, whilst taking advantage of the boat’s licences bar. The cruise costs £15 for adults.

Poole Fireworks
Poole Fireworks

Christchurch Carnival

If that isn’t sufficient summer firework action, Christchurch Carnival has its own display on Saturday 13th August, which takes place at 9 pm on the quayside.

Full disclosure; I meant to go to the first firework display of the season in Bournemouth on Friday, but wine was drunk beforehand and I didn’t quite make it. Managing instead, to fall asleep, then be woken at 10 pm and wonder what all the bloody banging was? So I borrowed some photos off the internet. Next week, I will try to stay awake…

100 Things to do in (and around) Bournemouth 52 – Frolic in the Countryside

White Star Running

I love to run. I’m not very good at it. In fact I’d go as far as to say I’m actually pretty bad at it. But I don’t let that deter me. One of my favourite ways to spend the weekend is to attend a White Star Running event.

Keeping Running Rural

This Poole based running event planning company with the motto ‘Keep Running Rural’ organises events in rural Dorset. Events usually take place over a weekend, with a range of distances on offer. But everyone’s favourite event (well, mine, anyway) is the Frolic.

The Frolic

A Frolic is a 12 hour race, run over a lap of somewhere in the region of 3 to 6 miles. The aim is to complete as many laps as you can in the allotted time. Sounds serious, right? It’s not. You set off around 8 am (you can enter either solo or as part of a team, who run in relay style with a squeaky beaver baton). You can run, or walk – running is optional – as many, or as few laps as you wish. As long as you complete a minimum of one lap, you earn your goodies (this weekend’s consisted of a medal, cider, fudge and the aforementioned squeaky beaver).

The Love Station

Half way round the course is the ‘Love Station’, which provides drinks and snacks (I usually opt for a handful each of Frazzles and Jelly Beans, with the occasional cheese & pineapple on stick). At the start of the day, drinks consisted of water, squash or coke. On my fourth lap, the schnapps had made an appearance.

Pop up Gin Bar

Sometimes, a pop up gin bar appears at a random location on the course. Just when you think you can’t run (walk) another step, there it is, like a mirage in the Dorset desert.

Race Village

Laps start/finish at the Race Village; here you will find is a further drink station, a bar and a choice of food stalls. The ice cream van is an integral part of a White Star weekend. In addition, there is a shop selling White Star merchandise. Lap completed, you can opt to either stop, go round again, or take a break and continue later. I returned to my tent after three laps, took a nap and then felt sufficiently rejuvenated for a fourth lap.

Camping

Some runners choose to come for the day, however, at many events, camping is an option. The camp site is equipped with portaloos, which are emptied regularly, hot showers and catering (this weekend’s consisted of a burger van, pancake van, coffee van and bar). Once the event has finished, there is entertainment; this weekend there was a barn dance. We were all too tired to contemplate dancing, but the live band were really good, so we sat outside our tents and drank cider and enjoyed the music, whilst discussing plans for the next event…

Conclusion

I really enjoy my frolics. If you’re in the Dorset area, I thoroughly recommend entering one. If you’re not in the Dorset area, I thoroughly recommend the Dorset area.

100 Things to do in (and around) Bournemouth 51 – A Brush of Genius

Having not done any painting since I put down my brushes after my O Level art exam in 1982, one of my lockdown hobbies was pebble painting. Today, I’m taking it one step further; I am going to take on a Hockney painting . A Brush of Genius, aka artist Stuart Faulkner, offers art classes where participants attempt to replicate a masterpiece.

David Hockney - The Diver
David Hockney – The Diver

Today’s class, at The Red House Museum in Christchurch, will be on David Hockney’s The Diver; a piece commissioned to promote the 1972 Munich Olympic Games. As a student, I lived in the Olympic Village in Munich, so this painting and I go way back.

Starting painting

Its a bit of a stressful start to the afternoon. It’s a sunny summer’s day, so the traffic is heaving and finding somewhere to park is a nightmare. I finally find a spot but arrive ten minutes late. The remaining class members have already finished sketching the torso and I am playing catch up.

Original and Copy

Stuart helps me get started. I soon have something looking vaguely like a man’s body on my canvas and can start on the water, which is therapeutic. Throughout the class, Stuart demonstrates technique step-by-step, interspersed with telling us interesting facts about Hockney, his life and work.

Starting on the water

Once the water is painted, back to finalising the torso. I have a bit of a problem with the shading of the muscles. My diver looks like he’s had very recent open heart surgery, but Stuart helps me to improve my shading. I finish with putting the details into the face. He asks me if I am going for a Japanese Manga effect with my diver? I say yes.

Group Photo with final paintings

Final task is to outline the water splodges (technical term) in white. The class is three hours long, which passes amazingly quickly. I need to leave ten minutes early as my parking slot has a three hour time limit. I don’t quite manage to get the water finished, but I really enjoyed my afternoon and am quite pleased with the results.

Finishing off at home

The three hour class cost £22, including instruction, materials and refreshments. A Brush of Genius classes take place with different paintings for inspiration over a variety of locations in and around Bournemouth. Some include alcohol and nibbles. I shall definitely be back. Next up, in September; Jean Metzinger’s Paysage Coloré aux Oiseaux Aquatiques and Monet’s The beach and the Falaise D’Amont. A career as an art forger is not on the cards!

Jean Metzinger - Paysage Coloré aux Oiseaux Aquatiques
Jean Metzinger – Paysage Coloré aux Oiseaux Aquatiques
Monet - The Beach and the Falaise D'Amont
Monet – The Beach and the Falaise D’Amont